Wider music community: What will happen to the music distribution industry in the UK as the government cracks down on illegal download music?

“Internet users who illegally download music, movies and e-books will be sent warning letters in a crackdown that could lead to court action for copyright theft,” say the Daily Mail. “A new regime to tackle online piracy will in effect treat individuals as ‘guilty until proven innocent’.” Those wrongly accused of pirating download musicwill have to pay a £20 fee to appeal in a move that has angered consumer groups but given hope to the music community.

“The controls on internet piracy, due to come into effect in early 2014, were outlined yesterday by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom under the Digital Economy Act 2010,” explains the Daily Mail article. “The same Act includes punishments that could, in future, see accused families having their internet service slowed down, capped or even cut off. A music distribution industry code will require large internet service providers (ISPs) such as BT, Virgin, Sky and TalkTalk to send warning letters to families suspected by entertainment firms of illegal download music activity or uploading copyright material.If a customer gets three letters or more within a year, copyright holders such as movie and music companies will have a right to ask for details of the material involved. These companies will then be able to apply for a court order requiring the ISP to reveal the customer’s name and address.
The information would be used to pursue the person involved through the civil courts for damages. However, there are concerns that innocent internet users, for example those whose wireless connections are hijacked by a neighbour or criminal, will be caught up in the new regime.Those sent a warning letter will be assumed guilty unless they can prove their innocence after paying a £20 fee to appeal to an Ofcom body.”

Mike O’Connor, of the customer body Consumer Focus, said: ‘Copyright infringement is not to be condoned, but people who are innocent should not have to pay a fee to challenge accusations. It could deter those living on low incomes from challenging unfair allegations.’ If the new system does not stop piracy, ministers will be able to go back to Parliament to enact rules in the Digital Economy Act that could see households having their internet service cut off.
‘The ability to appeal is therefore critical to ensure consumers who have done nothing wrong are not deprived of internet access further down the line,’ said Mr O’Connor. Creative industries minister Ed Vaizey said entertainment firms had to be able to ‘protect their investment’, adding: ‘The Digital Economy Act is an important part of protecting our creative industries against unlawful activity.’ Ofcom’s Claudio Pollack said: ‘Ofcom will oversee a fair appeals process, and also ensure that rights holders’ investigations under the code are rigorous and transparent.’

I understand the consumer groups’ concern but piracy is just not something the music community, and the wider community should accept anymore. We all love to listen to music, discover new bands and share new music. But we as a music community need to be wary of the danger to the new bands and new music if we download music illegally. Music distribution is an industry like all the others. Why do we think it’s different for musicians? They want to sell music online so that they can make money to live. It’s important that the music community take responsibility for music distribution. We need to take charge. We need to buy and sell music online so there can even be a music distribution industry. How can musicians eat if they aren’t paid for their work? Even when they sell music online it gets plagiarized.

We as the music community should understand that new bands cannot be made if we continue to download music illegally. The new music will simply not be made if the artists can’t sell music online. The music distribution industry will be killed along with the creativity. The time is now, music community, to stand up and do something about it so that new bands will be able to have a future. They will also need to learn how to promote a band in the age of audio samples, though! It’s not just about sticking with the status quo. To sell music online in this day and age is the only way to make any money. People are not buying CDs anymore. But how do we stop people from stealing download music? Music websites like Songeist.com are doing their part to win the war on illegal audio samples. Now, music community, what are you going to do?

John Robert write for music communities and bands for more information on music distribution, new bands, new music and audio samples please visit songeist.com.

Share!
internet piracy
Image by Perrenque
Sharing
By: Kevin Roberts, CEO Saatchi & Saatchi

Anyone in the creative industry has to feel for music and movie businesses as they battle piracy and file sharing. The desire for FREE on the Internet is a huge challenge to anyone who produces digital entertainment. I think that emerging from the torrent of files containing movies, TV shows, and music tracks that are being forwarded from computer to computer, is a word that will have a terrific impact on our future. That word is share.

In a world where the environment is under threat and credit is harder to find than a CEO on a lunch break, the ability to share – and come up with products that encourage sharing – is a new frontier for innovation. We’re already familiar with some prescient examples, like Zipcar. They set out to help people without cars to share one for a limited time but are inspired by a larger purpose: to enable simple and responsible urban living. You want to pick your mother up from the airport? Zipcar is a great solution to do what you need to do.

The Internet is a virtual machine for sharing – YouTube to share your creativity; Facebook to share your life; Second Life to share your dreams; Wikipedia to share your knowledge and eBay to share your belongings! This is sharing as a way to get more value – and who doesn’t have that near the top of their agenda? It’s not about less but about better. One efficient lawn mower for the street. A full set of home handy tools for an apartment building. Where it gets interesting is the emotional adjustments people are prepared to make. However hard we try to encourage our kids to share, anyone with a two-year-old knows that it doesn’t come naturally! Sharing is a skill born of empathy. We learn it as we learn how to work and play together and to make compromises that benefit us all. Sharing can inspire a renewed sense of community and belonging. Who doesn’t want to have that as part of their life? I believe that making things to share will become a trillion dollar industry as we work together to make the world a better place for us all to live in.

Share this thought with a friend.

krconnect.blogspot.com/2009/03/sharing.html

BTW, thanks Sergiorecaberren for sharing this pic with me
www.flickr.com/photos/sergiorecabarren/

Please note my acknowledgements, sources and creative commons licence was cut off at end of video for some reason when I uploaded it. See below for full information:

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/.

Acknowledgements and Sources:

Bruns, A. (2010). Distributed Creativity: Filesharing and Produsage. In S. Sonvilla-Weiss (Ed.), Mashup Cultures. Vienna: Springer.

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Jenkins, Henry. (2004). The Cultural Logic of Media Convergence. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 7(1), 33-43. doi: 10.1177/1367877904040603

Jenkins, Henry. (2009a, 18/02/2009). If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part Four): Thinking Through the Gift Economy Retrieved from http://henryjenkins.org/2009/02/if_it_doesnt_spread_its_dead_p_3.html

Jenkins, Henry. (2009b, 16/02/2009). If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part Three): The Gift Economy and Commodity Culture. Retrieved from http://henryjenkins.org/2009/02/if_it_doesnt_spread_its_dead_p_2.html

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LeMay, Renai. (2013, 03/04/2013). Despite quick, cheap, legal option, Australia still top Games of Thrones pirating nation. Delimiter. Retrieved 15/08/2014, from http://delimiter.com.au/2013/04/03/despite-quick-cheap-legal-option-australia-still-top-games-of-thrones-pirating-nation/

LeMay, Renai. (2014, 03/02/2014). Screw you, Australia: Game of Thrones goes Foxtel-only. Delminiter. Retrieved 15/08/2014, from http://delimiter.com.au/2014/02/03/screw-australia-game-thrones-goes-foxtel/

Manovich, L. (2009). The Practice of Everyday (Media) Life: From Mass Consumption to Mass Cultural Production? Critical Inquiry, 35(2), 319-331. doi: 10.1086/596645

mezclaconfusa. (2012, 11/02/2012). Games of Thrones. Retrieved 10/08/2014, from https://http://www.flickr.com/photos/59087292@N07/6855051531/

Newman, Michael Z. (2009, 03/04/2009). P2P TV: Ethical Considerations. Flow TV. 9(10). from http://flowtv.org/2009/04/p2p-tv-ethical-considerationsmichael-z-newman-university-of-wisconsin-milwaukee/

Reynolds, Megan. (2014, 08/04/2014). Piracy: Australians lead the world for illegal downloads of Game of Thrones. MumBRELLA.

Retrieved 15/08/2014, from http://mumbrella.com.au/australia-leads-way-illegal-downloads-game-thrones-219249

Wikstrom, P. (2010). The Social and Creative Music Fan The Music Industry: Music in the Cloud (pp. 147-169): Polity.
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