The Pros And Cons Of Digital Music Files

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Very much has changed about the way businesses and people in society handle their work and personal business. With the introduction of advancements in technology, a great many improvements have been made that have benefited us and helped improve our quality of living. The internet, for example, has greatly revolutionized the way we retrieve information, and it has also expanded our ways of communicating with one another. What could only be done through landline phones can now be done over the computer via instant messaging, chat rooms, and video conferencing.

How we communicate and how we conduct business are not the only things that have changed. One sector that plays an important role in a lot of people’s lives has also made great strides in technology. That sector is music and all things that are related to music.
The way we listen to music has changed, and the way we record our music has also changed as more instruments feature better ways of recording. From instruments to the very songs that we listen to, technology has definitely changed the way we utilize these things in our everyday lives.

First came the 8 track. Then the cassette tape. Then the compact disc, and now music is downloadable via the internet. The usual cost of a single song is about 99 cents, but some sites will offer whole albums at a discounted price, and sites like Zune allow unlimited downloads for just a few bucks every month. There is no need to buy an actual compact disc at a record store anymore, which has affected music stores nationwide. Many big music names, such as Wherehouse and Virgin, have shut down many, if not all, of their outlets.

The other bad side about digital music files is the issue of piracy, and it has cost many musicians millions of dollars in lost sales. File-sharing programs and sites are readily available and accessible by just about anyone who has access to a computer and the internet. Thus, these files can be uploaded onto a computer and shared freely over these file-sharing sites and programs. At the expense of musicians, all it takes is one person to buy these files, make them available on these sites or programs, and virtually anyone can download them.

There is no way to monitor each individual who downloads files that are protected by copyright laws, and it is up to the individual to decide whether or not they will or will not use these file-sharing sites or programs for their music.

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Cypherpunks Freedom and the Future of the Internet – Julian Assange with Jacob Appelbaum, Andy Muller-Maguhn and Jeremie Zimmermann
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Image by Iron Man Records
"Cypherpunks is gripping, vital reading, explaining clearly the way in which corporate and government control of the internet poses a fundamental threat to our freedom and democracy". — Oliver Stone

"Obligatory reading for everyone interested in the reality of our freedoms." — Slavoj Zizek

"The power of this book is that it breaks a silence. It marks an insurrection of subjugated knowledge that is, above all, a warning to all." — John Pilger

Buy Cypherpunks Freedom and the Future of the Internet here: stores.ebay.co.uk/Iron-Man-Shop

Cypherpunks are activists who advocate the widespread use of strong cryptography (writing in code) as a route to progressive change. Julian Assange, the editor-in-chief of and visionary behind WikiLeaks, has been a leading voice in the cypherpunk movement since its inception in the 1980s.

Now, in what is sure to be a wave-making new book, Assange brings together a small group of cutting-edge thinkers and activists from the front line of the battle for cyber-space to discuss whether electronic communications will emancipate or enslave us. Among the topics addressed are: Do Facebook and Google constitute "the greatest surveillance machine that ever existed," perpetually tracking our location, our contacts and our lives? Far from being victims of that surveillance, are most of us willing collaborators? Are there legitimate forms of surveillance, for instance in relation to the "Four Horsemen of the Infopocalypse" (money laundering, drugs, terrorism and pornography)? And do we have the ability, through conscious action and technological savvy, to resist this tide and secure a world where freedom is something which the Internet helps bring about?

The harassment of WikiLeaks and other Internet activists, together with attempts to introduce anti-file sharing legislation such as SOPA and ACTA, indicate that the politics of the Internet have reached a crossroads. In one direction lies a future that guarantees, in the watchwords of the cypherpunks, "privacy for the weak and transparency for the powerful"; in the other lies an Internet that allows government and large corporations to discover ever more about internet users while hiding their own activities. Assange and his co-discussants unpick the complex issues surrounding this crucial choice with clarity and engaging enthusiasm.

Publication November 2012 • 192 pages
Paperback ISBN 978-1-939293-00-8 • Ebook ISBN 978-1-939293-01-5

Julian Assange is the editor in chief of WikiLeaks. An original contributor to the cypherpunk mailing list, Assange is the author of numerous software projects in line with the cypherpunk philosophy, including the Rubberhose encryption system and the original code for WikiLeaks. An ‘ethical hacker’ in his teens, and subsequently an activist and internet service provider to Australia during the 1990s, he is the co-author (with Sulette Dreyfus) of Underground, a history of the international hacker movement. "Julian is currently a refugee under the protection of the government of Ecuador, and lives in the Ecuadorian embassy in London."

Jacob Appelbaum is a staff research scientist at the University of Washington, and a developer and advocate for the Tor Project, which is an online anonymity system for everyday people to fight against surveillance and against internet censorship.

Andy Müller-Maguhn is a long time member of, and former spokesman for, the Chaos Computer Club in Germany. A specialist on surveillance he runs a company called Cryptophone, which markets secure voice communication devices to commercial clients.

Jérémie Zimmermann is the co-founder and spokesperson for the citizen advocacy group La Quadrature du Net, the most prominent European organization defending anonymity rights online and promoting awareness of regulatory attacks on online freedoms.

AN EXCHANGE FROM CYPHERPUNKS:

JULIAN:
I want to look at what I see as a difference between a US cypherpunk perspective and the European perspective, which I think is quite interesting. The US Second Amendment is the right to bear arms. Just recently I was watching some footage that a friend shot in the US on the right to bear arms, and above a firearms store it says ‘Democracy, Locked and Loaded,’ and that’s the way that you ensure that you don’t have totalitarian regimes – that people are armed and if they are pissed off enough, then they simply take their arms and they retake control by force. Whether that argument is still valid now is actually an interesting one because of the difference in the types of arms that have occurred over the past 30 years. So, we can look back to this declaration that code-making, providing secret cryptographic codes that the government couldn’t spy on, was in fact a munition, and this big war that we fought in the 1990s to try and make cryptography available to everyone, which we largely won.

JAKE:
In the West?

JULIAN:
In the West we largely won and it’s in every browser – it is now perhaps being back-doored and subverted in different kinds of ways. The notion is that you cannot trust a government to implement the policies that it says that it is implementing, and so we must provide the underlying tools, cryptographic tools that we control, as a sort of use of force, in that if the ciphers are good no matter how hard it tries a government cannot break into your communications directly. Maybe it can put a bug in your house or whatever.

JAKE:
Force of authority is derived from violence. One must acknowledge with cryptography no amount of violence will ever solve the math problem.

JULIAN:
Exactly.

JAKE:
And this is the important key. It doesn’t mean you can’t be tortured, it doesn’t mean that they can’t try and bug your house or subvert it some way but it means that if they find an encrypted message it doesn’t matter if they have the force of the authority behind everything that they do, they cannot solve that math problem. This is the thing though that is totally non-obvious to people that are non-technical and it has to be driven home. If we could solve all of those math problems, it would be a different story and, of course, the government will be able to solve those math problems if anyone could.

JULIAN:
But it’s just a fact. It just happens to be a fact about reality, such as that you can build atomic bombs, that there are math problems that you can create that even the strongest state cannot directly break. I think that was tremendously appealing to Californian libertarians and others who believed in this sort of ‘democracy locked and loaded,’ and here was a very intellectual way of doing it – of a couple of individuals with cryptography standing up to the full power of the strongest suit of power in the world. And we’re still doing that a little bit, but I wonder, I have a view that the likely outcome is that those are really tremendously big economic forces and tremendously big political forces, like Jérémie was saying, and that the natural efficiencies of these technologies compared to the number of human beings will mean that slowly we will end up in a global totalitarian surveillance society. By totalitarian I mean a total surveillance, and that perhaps there’ll just be the last free living people – and these last free living people are those who understand how to use this cryptography to defend against this complete, total surveillance, and some people who are completely off-grid, neo-Luddites that have gone into the cave, or traditional tribes-people. And these traditional people have none of the efficiencies of a modern economy so their ability to act is very small. Are we headed for that sort of scenario?

JÉRÉMIE:
First of all, if you look at it from a market perspective, I’m convinced that there is a market in privacy that has been mostly left unexplored, so maybe there will be an economic drive for companies to develop tools that will give users the individual ability to control their data and communication. Maybe this is one way that we can solve that problem. I’m not sure it can work alone, but this may happen and we may not know it yet. Also it is interesting to see that what you’re describing is the power of the hackers, in a way – ‘hackers’ in the primary sense of the term, not a criminal. A hacker is a technology enthusiast, is somebody who likes to understand how technology works, not to be trapped into technology but to make it work better. I suppose that when you were five or seven you had a screwdriver and tried to open devices to understand what it was like inside. So, this is what being a hacker is, and hackers built the Internet for many reasons, also because it was fun, and they have developed it and have given the Internet to everybody else. Companies like Google and Facebook saw the opportunity to build business models based on capturing users’ personal data. But still we see a form of power in the hands of hackers and what is my primary interest these days is that we see these hackers gaining power, even in the political arenas. In the US there has been these SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) and PIPA (Protect IP Act) legislations – violent copyright legislation that basically gives Hollywood the power to order any Internet company to restrict access and to censor the internet.

JULIAN:
And banking blockades like the one we’re suffering from.

JÉRÉMIE:
Exactly. What happened to WikiLeaks from the banking companies was becoming the standard method to fight the evil copyright pirates that killed Hollywood and so on. And we witnessed this tremendous uproar from civil society on the Internet – and not only in the US, it couldn’t have worked if it was only US citizens who rose up against SOPA and PIPA. It was people all around the world that participated, and hackers were at the core of it and were providing tools to the others to help participate in the public debate.

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Finding ways to Fight Music Piracy

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You might remember when Napster was the next big threat to the music industry not long ago when it was the big thing. This file sharing service used peer-to-peer technology to allow people to do music downloads for free from computers that belonged to other Napster customers.

The Napster explosion brought with it numerous violations of copyright and issues with music piracy. Music artists went through damaging dips to their sales and revenue, and that was the source of deep worry for the music industry.

The popularity of Napster and other P2P networks showed that people were OK with the idea of downloading music for free if they could. Napster went into bankruptcy after failing to win a legal battle with several music labels.

Apple’s iTunes then served as a savior for the industry by providing a way for people to legally download music for a fee. While music piracy is not totally banished, it has certainly lessened.

In making a model to fight music piracy, there are certain things it must do to become effective among music consumers. The elements that must be in place to fight music piracy include…

*It has to be convenient to use.

The new music access solution It must be easy to access and to use. Sometimes legal tools for downloading music requires a certain amount of technical savvy, users can become discouraged with confusing interfaces. When the tools to use the software are convenient, more music customers will use it.

* Provide a variety in search abilities and ease of use.

It is crucial that the music download site have a wide selection of songs. It is just as important that the songs are not hard to find. Ease of use is something illegal downloading sites fail to offer because of the service is free.

* Make them feel secure.

P2p file sharing programs scare people because of the potential that is there to download a virus along with their music from one of the free music services. Users are happy to pay for their music if they can get the music they want that danger.

* Costs that make sense.

When music companies Use the Internet to release music. that cuts down on the costs of album distribution and sales. The ?middle men? are taken out of the picture. This means that it makes sense that the price for the music goes down.

The elimination of the cost of creating hard copy album, CD when digital music is downloaded is out of the picture too. The result is that your online customers should be able to get their digital music for a reduced cost.

The music industry has have learned a great deal about What people think about illegal file sharing. Contrary to what was believed, people want to pay for the music made by their favorite artists and they do not like the idea of stealing the music that they love

Music fans, though, also want the variety, the convenience, the security and realistic cost that come from getting their music online. Every year, more legal online music downloading sites are giving their customers what they want and the result is that they are generating a new income stream for musicians and music companies. This approach is a long term solution.

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CISPA extinct monsters
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Image by Mataparda
Imagen original extraida de Extinct monsters; a popular account of some of the larger forms of ancient animal life (1896) en archive.org (Lámina XII), pero descubierta a través del recomendable blog BibliOdyssey, con un fragmento de texto de la EFF

Para El #Manifiesto en la red

Rogers’ “Cybersecurity” Bill Is Broad Enough to Use Against WikiLeaks and The Pirate Bay

Congress is doing it again: they’re proposing overbroad regulations that could have dire consequences for our Internet ecology. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (H.R. 3523), introduced by Rep. Mike Rogers and Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, allows companies or the government1 free rein to bypass existing laws in order to monitor communications, filter content, or potentially even shut down access to online services for “cybersecurity purposes.” Companies are encouraged to share data with the government and with one another, and the government can share data in return. The idea is to facilitate detection of and defense against a serious cyber threat, but the definitions in the bill go well beyond that. The language is so broad it could be used as a blunt instrument to attack websites like The Pirate Bay or WikiLeaks. Join EFF in calling on Congress to stop the Rogers’ cybersecurity bill.

Under the proposed legislation, a company that protects itself or other companies against “cybersecurity threats” can “use cybersecurity systems to identify and obtain cyber threat information to protect the rights and property” of the company under threat. But because “us[ing] cybersecurity systems” is incredibly vague, it could be interpreted to mean monitoring email, filtering content, or even blocking access to sites. A company acting on a “cybersecurity threat” would be able to bypass all existing laws, including laws prohibiting telcos from routinely monitoring communications, so long as it acted in “good faith.”

The broad language around what constitutes a cybersecurity threat leaves the door wide open for abuse. For example, the bill defines “cyber threat intelligence” and “cybersecurity purpose” to include “theft or misappropriation of private or government information, intellectual property, or personally identifiable information.”

Yes, intellectual property. It’s a little piece of SOPA wrapped up in a bill that’s supposedly designed to facilitate detection of and defense against cybersecurity threats. The language is so vague that an ISP could use it to monitor communications of subscribers for potential infringement of intellectual property. An ISP could even interpret this bill as allowing them to block accounts believed to be infringing, block access to websites like The Pirate Bay believed to carry infringing content, or take other measures provided they claimed it was motivated by cybersecurity concerns.

The language of “theft or misappropriation of private or government information” is equally concerning. Regardless of the intent of this language, the end result is that the government and Internet companies could use this language to block sites like WikiLeaks and NewYorkTimes.com, both of which have published classified information. Online publishers like WikiLeaks are currently afforded protection under the First Amendment; receiving and publishing classified documents from a whistleblower is a common journalistic practice. While there’s uncertainty about whether the Espionage Act could be brought to bear against WikiLeaks, it is difficult to imagine a situation where the Espionage Act would apply to WikiLeaks without equally applying to the New York Times, the Washington Post, and in fact everyone who reads about the cablegate releases. But under Rogers’ cybersecurity proposal, the government would have new, powerful tools to go after WikiLeaks. By claiming that WikiLeaks constituted “cyber threat intelligence” (aka “theft or misappropriation of private or government information”), the government may be empowering itself and other companies to monitor and block the site. This means that the previous tactics used to silence WikiLeaks—including a financial blockade and shutting down their accounts with online service providers—could be supplemented by very direct means. The government could proclaim that WikiLeaks constitutes a cybersecurity threat and have new, broad powers to filter and block communication with the journalistic website.

Congress is intent on passing cybersecurity legislation this year, and there are multiple proposals in the House and the Senate under debate. But none is as poorly drafted and dangerously vague as the Rogers bill. We need to stop this bill in its tracks, before it can advance in the House and before the authors can negotiate to place this overbroad language into other cybersecurity proposals.

Internet security is a serious problem that needs to be addressed. But we don’t need to sacrifice our civil liberties to do so.

Wider music community: What will happen to the music distribution industry in the UK as the government cracks down on illegal download music?

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“Internet users who illegally download music, movies and e-books will be sent warning letters in a crackdown that could lead to court action for copyright theft,” say the Daily Mail. “A new regime to tackle online piracy will in effect treat individuals as ‘guilty until proven innocent’.” Those wrongly accused of pirating download musicwill have to pay a £20 fee to appeal in a move that has angered consumer groups but given hope to the music community.

“The controls on internet piracy, due to come into effect in early 2014, were outlined yesterday by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom under the Digital Economy Act 2010,” explains the Daily Mail article. “The same Act includes punishments that could, in future, see accused families having their internet service slowed down, capped or even cut off. A music distribution industry code will require large internet service providers (ISPs) such as BT, Virgin, Sky and TalkTalk to send warning letters to families suspected by entertainment firms of illegal download music activity or uploading copyright material.If a customer gets three letters or more within a year, copyright holders such as movie and music companies will have a right to ask for details of the material involved. These companies will then be able to apply for a court order requiring the ISP to reveal the customer’s name and address.
The information would be used to pursue the person involved through the civil courts for damages. However, there are concerns that innocent internet users, for example those whose wireless connections are hijacked by a neighbour or criminal, will be caught up in the new regime.Those sent a warning letter will be assumed guilty unless they can prove their innocence after paying a £20 fee to appeal to an Ofcom body.”

Mike O’Connor, of the customer body Consumer Focus, said: ‘Copyright infringement is not to be condoned, but people who are innocent should not have to pay a fee to challenge accusations. It could deter those living on low incomes from challenging unfair allegations.’ If the new system does not stop piracy, ministers will be able to go back to Parliament to enact rules in the Digital Economy Act that could see households having their internet service cut off.
‘The ability to appeal is therefore critical to ensure consumers who have done nothing wrong are not deprived of internet access further down the line,’ said Mr O’Connor. Creative industries minister Ed Vaizey said entertainment firms had to be able to ‘protect their investment’, adding: ‘The Digital Economy Act is an important part of protecting our creative industries against unlawful activity.’ Ofcom’s Claudio Pollack said: ‘Ofcom will oversee a fair appeals process, and also ensure that rights holders’ investigations under the code are rigorous and transparent.’

I understand the consumer groups’ concern but piracy is just not something the music community, and the wider community should accept anymore. We all love to listen to music, discover new bands and share new music. But we as a music community need to be wary of the danger to the new bands and new music if we download music illegally. Music distribution is an industry like all the others. Why do we think it’s different for musicians? They want to sell music online so that they can make money to live. It’s important that the music community take responsibility for music distribution. We need to take charge. We need to buy and sell music online so there can even be a music distribution industry. How can musicians eat if they aren’t paid for their work? Even when they sell music online it gets plagiarized.

We as the music community should understand that new bands cannot be made if we continue to download music illegally. The new music will simply not be made if the artists can’t sell music online. The music distribution industry will be killed along with the creativity. The time is now, music community, to stand up and do something about it so that new bands will be able to have a future. They will also need to learn how to promote a band in the age of audio samples, though! It’s not just about sticking with the status quo. To sell music online in this day and age is the only way to make any money. People are not buying CDs anymore. But how do we stop people from stealing download music? Music websites like Songeist.com are doing their part to win the war on illegal audio samples. Now, music community, what are you going to do?

John Robert write for music communities and bands for more information on music distribution, new bands, new music and audio samples please visit songeist.com.

Share!
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Image by Perrenque
Sharing
By: Kevin Roberts, CEO Saatchi & Saatchi

Anyone in the creative industry has to feel for music and movie businesses as they battle piracy and file sharing. The desire for FREE on the Internet is a huge challenge to anyone who produces digital entertainment. I think that emerging from the torrent of files containing movies, TV shows, and music tracks that are being forwarded from computer to computer, is a word that will have a terrific impact on our future. That word is share.

In a world where the environment is under threat and credit is harder to find than a CEO on a lunch break, the ability to share – and come up with products that encourage sharing – is a new frontier for innovation. We’re already familiar with some prescient examples, like Zipcar. They set out to help people without cars to share one for a limited time but are inspired by a larger purpose: to enable simple and responsible urban living. You want to pick your mother up from the airport? Zipcar is a great solution to do what you need to do.

The Internet is a virtual machine for sharing – YouTube to share your creativity; Facebook to share your life; Second Life to share your dreams; Wikipedia to share your knowledge and eBay to share your belongings! This is sharing as a way to get more value – and who doesn’t have that near the top of their agenda? It’s not about less but about better. One efficient lawn mower for the street. A full set of home handy tools for an apartment building. Where it gets interesting is the emotional adjustments people are prepared to make. However hard we try to encourage our kids to share, anyone with a two-year-old knows that it doesn’t come naturally! Sharing is a skill born of empathy. We learn it as we learn how to work and play together and to make compromises that benefit us all. Sharing can inspire a renewed sense of community and belonging. Who doesn’t want to have that as part of their life? I believe that making things to share will become a trillion dollar industry as we work together to make the world a better place for us all to live in.

Share this thought with a friend.

krconnect.blogspot.com/2009/03/sharing.html

BTW, thanks Sergiorecaberren for sharing this pic with me
www.flickr.com/photos/sergiorecabarren/

Please note my acknowledgements, sources and creative commons licence was cut off at end of video for some reason when I uploaded it. See below for full information:

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/.

Acknowledgements and Sources:

Bruns, A. (2010). Distributed Creativity: Filesharing and Produsage. In S. Sonvilla-Weiss (Ed.), Mashup Cultures. Vienna: Springer.

Burgess, J, & Green, J. (2009). The Entrepreneurial Vlogger: Participatory Culture Beyond the Professional-Amateur Divide. In P. Vonderau & P. Snickars (Eds.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 89-107): National Library of Sweden.

Jenkins, Henry. (2004). The Cultural Logic of Media Convergence. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 7(1), 33-43. doi: 10.1177/1367877904040603

Jenkins, Henry. (2009a, 18/02/2009). If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part Four): Thinking Through the Gift Economy Retrieved from http://henryjenkins.org/2009/02/if_it_doesnt_spread_its_dead_p_3.html

Jenkins, Henry. (2009b, 16/02/2009). If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part Three): The Gift Economy and Commodity Culture. Retrieved from http://henryjenkins.org/2009/02/if_it_doesnt_spread_its_dead_p_2.html

Kalina, Paul. (2014, 26/06/2014). Australia a world leader in TV piracy. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 22/08/2014, from http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/australia-a-world-leader-in-tv-piracy-20140623-zsfto.html

Klein, Jacob. (2013, 07/02/2014). How Much Does an HBO Subscription Cost These Days? Retrieved 15/08/2014, from http://hbowatch.com/how-much-does-an-hbo-subscription-cost-these-days/

Leaver, T. (2008). Watching Battlestar Galactica in Australia and the Tyranny of Digital Distance. Media International Australia, Incorporating Culture & Policy, 126, 145-154.

Leaver, T. (2010, 09/01/2010). FlashForward or FlashBack: Television Distribution in 2010. Flow TV. 9(10). Retrieved 22/08/2014, from http://flowtv.org/2010/01/flashforward-or-flashback-television-distribution-in-2010-tama-leaver-curtin-university-of-technology/

LeMay, Renai. (2013, 03/04/2013). Despite quick, cheap, legal option, Australia still top Games of Thrones pirating nation. Delimiter. Retrieved 15/08/2014, from http://delimiter.com.au/2013/04/03/despite-quick-cheap-legal-option-australia-still-top-games-of-thrones-pirating-nation/

LeMay, Renai. (2014, 03/02/2014). Screw you, Australia: Game of Thrones goes Foxtel-only. Delminiter. Retrieved 15/08/2014, from http://delimiter.com.au/2014/02/03/screw-australia-game-thrones-goes-foxtel/

Manovich, L. (2009). The Practice of Everyday (Media) Life: From Mass Consumption to Mass Cultural Production? Critical Inquiry, 35(2), 319-331. doi: 10.1086/596645

mezclaconfusa. (2012, 11/02/2012). Games of Thrones. Retrieved 10/08/2014, from https://http://www.flickr.com/photos/59087292@N07/6855051531/

Newman, Michael Z. (2009, 03/04/2009). P2P TV: Ethical Considerations. Flow TV. 9(10). from http://flowtv.org/2009/04/p2p-tv-ethical-considerationsmichael-z-newman-university-of-wisconsin-milwaukee/

Reynolds, Megan. (2014, 08/04/2014). Piracy: Australians lead the world for illegal downloads of Game of Thrones. MumBRELLA.

Retrieved 15/08/2014, from http://mumbrella.com.au/australia-leads-way-illegal-downloads-game-thrones-219249

Wikstrom, P. (2010). The Social and Creative Music Fan The Music Industry: Music in the Cloud (pp. 147-169): Polity.
Video Rating: / 5

Use Only Legal Music Downloads – Say No To Piracy

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When it comes to music downloads, there are unlimited number of options available today. Online music stores, entertainment website and the online music sharing sites are the most preferred one’s for music download. However, the music download options are very limited when considering the legal issues. Though downloading music from illegal sources often goes un-noticed, there are several other things to be considered. Consider the effort and money involved in creating a music album. Downloading pirated music is a huge pull back for the artists. Hence it is necessary to download music from legal sources. Internet surfers have a misconception that legal music downloads can be accomplished only by downloading from online music stores. The true fact is that there are many other sources in the Internet where you can get non-pirated free music downloads. Just keep reading on the article to know how to download music for free, legally.

The online music sharing websites are the places were you can download free unlimited music legally. Many people around the globe think that downloading music from online music sharing websites is an act of piracy. This thinking is completely wrong. As the online music sharing websites are bound to the Voluntary Collective Licensing of Music Files it is completely legal to download music from the online music sharing websites. As the name indicates, the online music sharing websites are basically used friends share music to your friends and other people. Hence you won’t be struck with the legal issues while downloading online music.

According the reliable news source, CNET news, “A new twist on file sharing is holding out the promise of allowing millions of people to share their song collections online, at no cost–and without legal risk”. With the advancements of piracy security measures in the Internet, the online music sharing websites safeguard unauthorized downloads. The copyrights of music are greatly honored on online music sharing websites. Moreover, you are allowed to share music though these online music sharing website only if you have purchased the rights to do so. Hence the artists and the users both get benefited.

These terms and conditions not only apply for online music but also for online videos. There are many online video sharing sites where you can download high quality videos for free. Downloading videos form these online video sharing websites is also completely legal. You will be well aware of the fact that downloading music and videos and music from the file sharing websites is completely legal in the United States. However, in some countries like Canada, the use of online music sharing websites and video sites are not appreciated.

Whatever the source you download the videos and music from, it is always good to make sure that they are not pirated copies. It is not good for the artist and also will result in the imprisonment of the user. Hence always look for legal sources like online music sharing websites and online video sharing websites.

Being a fan of Madonna’s unique music, the author used to download many songs of Madonna . He downloads the music for free through the online music sharing websites called PlanetClubs. He also gets the videos of Madonna from this unique online video site . He also recommends PlanteClubs to stream live videos of the best clubs in New York.

PROTECT IP Act Breaks The Internet on Vimeo by Fight for the Future
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Image by Ryan Tir
Tell Congress not to censor the internet NOW! – www.fightforthefuture.org/pipa

PROTECT-IP is a bill that has been introduced in the Senate and the House and is moving quickly through Congress. It gives the government and corporations the ability to censor the net, in the name of protecting "creativity". The law would let the government or corporations censor entire sites– they just have to convince a judge that the site is "dedicated to copyright infringement."

The government has already wrongly shut down sites without any recourse to the site owner. Under this bill, sharing a video with anything copyrighted in it, or what sites like Youtube and Twitter do, would be considered illegal behavior according to this bill.

According to the Congressional Budget Office, this bill would cost us million tax dollars a year — that’s for a fix that won’t work, disrupts the internet, stifles innovation, shuts out diverse voices, and censors the internet. This bill is bad for creativity and does not protect your rights.

Watch this video on Vimeo. Video created by Fight for the Future.

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The creator of the Epic Mickey: History of Disney and Skyward Sword: The History of Zelda, B-Mask, joins LaughingMan, CineMax, and Kenny Farino of GameJams in the third episode of the Official Cheshire Cat Studios Video Podcast. We vent on the subject of Internet piracy, the underhanded tactics by the music, movie, and game industries, Government censorship, horrible ads, suspect statistics, DRM control, and the companies who hate you for obtaining content that they refuse to even sell you.

Join us because it’s going to be a volatile, but hopefully enlightening and entertaining, discussion!

“internet piracy” riaa mpaa “video game piracy” “music piracy” “movie piracy” lawsuits censorship podcast “video podcast” “Epic Mickey” “Skyward Sword” GameJams

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Try Something New-Download Music Online

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If you are fond of music, you are sure to like the power to download songs online. Who wouldn’t? There is no other way to get all of the good music and bands that you adore, in one place, at one time, than to download music from the Internet. You will get everything you know and love and can come across some good artists that you may never have heard of before.

You can get literally millions of music files online. You won’t believe how straightforward it is to download the music that you get pleasure from when you locate a good download service. It’s really imperative to make sure that you come across a good, legitimate download service before you start pulling any files. If you get caught up with a website that is disreputable, you could end up in big trouble.

The government and the recording industry, in general, take pirated music sharing and loading very seriously. There are huge lawsuits that have occurred in the past and others that are at this time working their way through the judicial system, waiting to slap music pirates with huge fines and in some cases, many years behind bars.

There are many class action law suits against individuals who have been downloading music online, illegally. Piracy is a especially serious wrongdoing and the music community has been fighting for years in an attempt to terminate the piracy of online downloads. It’s serious business that has landed some otherwise unknowing, gullible and innocent people in jail for years and paying thousands of dollars in fines.

It’s effortless to unearth legitimate, lawful sources for music downloads. Run a inquiry on your preferred search engine and find out who provides legal downloads. You will possibly receive a very long list. You can drill down and uncover exactly what you’re searching for by getting more detailed. If there is a individual artist that you are looking for, type their name in the search field.

It is best to just leave dubious services alone and find one that you can guarantee won’t get you into trouble. You can find the best services for legal music downloads when you run a search on your preferred search engine. Just type in download songs online and you’ll get thousands, perhaps millions of hits back. Make sure to check out the top services that are listed on the search results page.

If you think you will be most interested in having a monthly subscription, shop around first. Make sure that all of the songs and artists and genres you’re looking for are obtainable before you make your purchase. If you cannot find what you are looking for on the first service you come to, rest assured, there are a lot of others to look into. Keep looking until you discover yourself a music downloading home.

You will discover songs from literally every genre available to download online. Some sites specialize in particular eras and artists. Many major download websites present you very hard to find music that you may have been searching for, for quite some time. Once you uncover a service that presents above-board service and you have verified that the website is lawful, you can start to download songs right away.

Pick the top music download sites for your entertainment enjoyment and discover the truth’s in relation to file share software at this moment for more information about music downloads for free visit my music blog now.

First Action in SLC Exposes TPP
internet piracy
Image by Backbone Campaign
Salt Lake Citizens mobilized the first of a week’s worth of actions to expose the TPP for what it is, Toxic for People and the Planet.

Photos by Jerrick Romero.
Visit SLCstopTPP.us

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Community rallies against the Trans-Pacific Partnership
Salt Lake City, UT November 19, 2013
Delegations from twelve national governments are meeting this week at Grand America Hotel in Salt Lake City to negotiate the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade agreement shrouded in secrecy designed to benefit multinational corporations. Activists and concerned citizens are planning actions throughout Salt Lake City to educate the public about the trade agreement and to protest the negotiations.
Citizens, journalists, activists and even members of Congress have been denied access to the agreement’s text, while representatives from multinational corporations have played a key role in the drafting process. This utter lack of transparency continues into the Salt Lake meetings, that were not disclosed to the public until very recently, and which journalists and community members will not be allowed to attend.
In spite of this short notice, the community has mobilized the TPP Welcoming Committee. On Tuesday at 10:30 a.m., these activists will hold an action at the Bureau of Land Management offices at 440 W. 200 S., to protest the selling off of our public lands to corporate interests. From there, they will march to a larger protest at Grand America Hotel, where organizers will speak out about the major problems of this trade pact and comment on actions that need to occur to halt this agreement which, if passed, will have pervasive negative effects on citizens of all signatory countries. On Tuesday night at 6 p.m., the TPP Welcoming Committee will hold a teach-in at the Utah Pride Center, 255 E. 400 S., to explain the impact the treaty will have on medical access, internet freedom, climate justice, labor rights and many other important issues. This will be followed by a creative nighttime light action at 8 p.m. outside Grand America Hotel, pulling the TPP out of the shadows and into public scrutiny.
Organizations like WikiLeaks have been able to obtain and release to the public only a small portion of the provisions of this secret agreement. They have exposed that the agreement expands copyright and patent monopolies, with alarming consequences. It enables pharmaceutical companies, for example, to use patents to substantially increase the costs of many drugs and therefore deprive people around the world of lifesaving medicine. The current draft of the agreement contains many of the same copyright provisions and controversial internet censorship powers previously contained in the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act, overwhelmingly opposed by the U.S. populace.
In addition, the TPP would create international tribunals in which corporations could sue governments to overturn sovereign laws and extract vital resources from taxpayers and communities. These courts, completely outside U.S. jurisdiction, would expand corporate power while undermining national sovereignty and local control.
The TPP and the secretive negotiations undermine free speech, further entrench corporate rule, deny people around the world lifesaving medicines and erode national sovereignty. The agreement is yet another example of the corrupting influence of money in our political process. Accordingly, those involved in the negotiations will face significant opposition and dissent from the TPP Welcoming Committee and other concerned citizens.
The TPP Welcoming Committee is a coalition of individuals and organizations including Backbone Campaign, Sole de Utah, Utah Tar Sands Resistance, the Justice Party, Center for a Stateless Society, Popular Resistance, Occupy.com, Washington Fair Trade Coalition, HESA-Heterodox Economics Student Association at the University of Utah, and March Against Monsanto.
For more information, call 805-776-3882, email slcstoptpp@gmail.com and visit www.slcstoptpp.us
END
###

You’ll Be Able To Download Music On-Line

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Should you be a music freak, you must download tunes online. There are plenty of methods for getting the music that you simply love, however this one just seems to make sense. If you already spend considerable time online, why shouldn’t you look first on the Internet?

If you want many different types of music, there is nowhere else you’ll find such a great selection of quality entertainment choices than on the web. You may never again need to bother about buying multiple CDs to get all of your favorite music. When you download songs online, you are able to pick and choose as you like.

So how great is it that you are able to create your very own music soundtrack, from an incredible number of available songs? You are able to cross genres and artists, whatever you choose. The best way to get started when you want to download songs online is to find a reliable source for your music. You need to find a website that provides music downloads that are licensed. You will get into lots of trouble for downloading music that is copyrighted and isn’t freed up for downloading.

There are some class action law suits against individuals who have been downloading songs online, illegally. Piracy is an extremely serious offense and the music community has been fighting for years in an effort to end the piracy of Internet downloads. It is serious business which has landed some otherwise unknowing, unsuspecting and innocent people in prison for years and paying thousands of dollars in fines.

Search and you can find reputable, and totallylegal sources for music downloads. Do a search on your favorite search engine and find out who provides legal downloads. You will probably be given a very long list. You can drill down and find exactly what you are wanting by getting more specific. When there is a particular artist that you are looking for, type their name within the search field.

There are certain large corporations that offer music downloads online. You Can pay per song, per album or in many cases, per month. Once you subscribe to a monthly subscription, you are able to generally download a certain number of tunes. Make sure that you divide how much the month-to-month service charge by the quantity of songs you can download online to make sure that you are a fantastic deal.

You need to be downloading lots of music, or you may be losing out. Look at the different artists’ web sites as well as record label sites for the tunes you love and wish to download. If you’ve got varied musical preferences, you might opt for a legitimate subscription plan to download music online.

Discover tunes from literally every genre available to download on the Internet. Several websites specialize in specific eras and music artists. Several major download websites offer you very difficult to find songs that you may have been trying to find, for quite a while. Once you find a site that provides dependable service and you have verified that the site is legal, you can start to download songs right away.

When you need more information on the practice of divx movies download and the various kinds of sites that you may use to check out how to watch movies online for info on file types and codecs, and several very good download sites.

Image from page 479 of “Old and new London : a narrative of its history, its people, and its places” (1873)
internet piracy
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: oldnewlondonnarr03thor
Title: Old and new London : a narrative of its history, its people, and its places
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Thornbury, Walter, 1828-1876
Subjects:
Publisher: London : Cassell, Petter, & Galpin
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
f 160 feetfrom the ground, a huge tank, capable of contain-ing 6,000 gallons of water, which is always kei)tcharged; from this tank pipes are conveyed to allparts of the edifice, with hydrants and hose alwaysattached at every point of vantage, so that at thefirst alarm of fire one man would be able unaided 462 OLD AND NEW LONDON. [Westminster School. to turn on the water to any point of danger. Theentire cost of these works amounted to ;i^2,ooo. It is not generally known that soon after theReformation the Abbey very nearly shared the fateof Tintern, Glastonbury, Reading, Kirkstall, andMalmesbury. Pennant writes, When the Pro-tector, Somerset, ruled in the fulness of power. this sacred pile narrowly escaped a total demoli-tion. It was his design to have pulled it downto the ground, and to have applied the materialstowards the palace which he was then erectingin the Sti-and, known by the name of SomersetHouse. He was diverted from his design by abribe of not fewer than fourteen manors I

Text Appearing After Image:
THE JERUSALEM CHAMBER. CHAPTER LV. WESTMINSTER SCHOOL. Dear the schoolboy spotWe neer forget, though there we are iotgol!—Byron. Abbot Ingulph and Queen EJgitha—A Monastic School in the Dark Ages—The Beginning of Westminster School—Henry VIlI.sAdditionsto the Foundation—The School as founded by Queen Elizabeth—Election of Queens Scholars- Challenges—Proposed remoalof theSchool—Dr. Goodmans House at Chiswick—The College Hall—The School-room—Latin Prayers still said—The Dormitory—The West-minster Play—Edmund Curlls Piracy of a School Oration—The Prince Regent and the Marquis of Anglesey—The College Gardens—ThiAccommodation for Queens Scholars—Rivalry between Westminster and Eton Boys— Fagging. Under the wing of almost every abbey andmonastery in England there grew up a school forthe education of the young; and Westminsterformed no exception to the general rule. Tanner,in his Notitia, tells us that there would appearto have been a school attached to

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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Illegal Music Downloads And The Law

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Ever since broadband was set up and made readily available to the general public, illegal music downloads have gone through the roof. Today, approximately 95% of all downloads are illegal and some 6.5m broadband users illegally download music on a daily basis.

Earlier this year, the music industry decided that enough was enough and that this multi million pound purge needed to stop. Discussions with John Hutton (The Business Secretary), Andy Burnham (The Culture Secretary) and major internet service providers (ISPs) resulted in tough new proposals governing the illegal download scene.

At this point, it is perhaps worth outlining the law when it comes to downloading music. The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (CDPA) is the current UK copyright law and gives the creators of literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works the right to control the ways in which their material may be used. These rights cover broadcast and public performance, copying, adapting, issuing, renting and lending copies to the public. By downloading music files illegally, you are in breech of the copying part of this law.

ISPs have been pressurised into clamping down on persistent illegal downloaders and in June of this year, Virgin Broadband (one of the largest ISPs in the UK) agreed to take steps towards culling downloads. Virgin expect to send out more than 12,000 letters over the course of the summer to internet users warning them to stop their illegal downloads or face restrictions on their service.

So what does this mean for internet downloaders? Well, Virgin are keen not to punish their users, they would rather ‘educate’ them on the wrongs of downloading illegally. Sounds like a cop out and a good way round enforcing the law, but they might not have much choice on this in a year’s time.

Huttin and Burnham, along with bosses from the music industry want tighter rules surrounding illegal downloads. One of the proposals includes placing a 30 GBP annual charge on people who want to download files. This would give users unlimited access to download files from anywhere on the net, without the worry of facing up to law. 30 GBP may not sound a lot, but as Peter Jenner stated; “If you get enough people paying a small amount of money you can turn around the wheels of the music industry.” The funds from these fees are worth almost 1.2bn GBP and would be channelled back to the industry and distributed proportionally back to the relative rights holders.

Obviously looking for the toughest penalties for repeat offenders, industry bosses are calling for a ‘three strikes and you’re out’ policy, similar to the scheme currently employed in France. Persistent offenders would be warned and banned if they didn’t stop. Other proposals include preventative filters which stop the possibility of any illegal download activity or, illegal downloaders’ details being given directly to the music industry for punishment.

Sites like Napster brought illegal downloads to the masses and were relatively untouched by officials for many years until they realised just how much impact illegal downloads were having on the music industry. In 2001, the company were forced to shut down after being found guilty of copyright infringement laws.

Today, Napster is a legitimate trading company and sells downloads instead of offering them for free. iTunes are the biggest players in this market and dominate the scene with a 70% share of legal music downloads. It took less than five years to reach 1bn downloads, and keen to show that legal downloads are the way forward, the company rewarded the downloader, Alex Ostrovsky, with a brand new iMac, ten iPods and a 10,000 USD (5,700 GBP) iTunes voucher. Not a bad return on his 99p investment.

In 2006, the download market really came up trumps when Gnarles Berkley had a hit with Crazy. The song hadn’t even been released on CD when it hit the top spot in the UK charts after Zane Lowe championed the song on his New Music Show.

So will pressure from the industry actually have any effect on downloads? ISPs have already cleared themselves of any wrong doing as they are merely ‘conduits’ of information – they don’t personally hold the files.

Illegal downloads will inevitably continue as new methods of file sharing are discovered and employed. At the end of the day, rules are there to be broken and problems are there to be solved. As long as CDs cost as much as they do, downloaders will see no reason to stop what they are doing. If a CD costs less than 1GBP to produce, the question remains: Why are we charged the earth to purchase them?

Samantha is an expert Research and Theatre consultant. Her current interests are UK shortbreaks including LEGOLAND Windsor and Alton Towers.

Pirate
internet piracy
Image by jurvetson
Seen all over the Internet Cafés of Croatia. Yar!
(Photo by Emily Melton, our intrepid international photojournalist. =)

Just got back from Utah myself.

P.S. This image has spooky powers. When I loaded it into iPhoto, the thumbnails became corrupted and when I uploaded to Flickr, my Safari browser crashed. Beware, all ye who enter here….

How Music Libraries Were Transformed By The Internet

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As with any new, widely accessible invention, the internet was feared for its easy and quick distribution of items and ideas. Many music labels and artists set forth an endeavor to prevent the use of the web as a means to spread their creations illegally. However, the progressive internet and those who inhabit it could not be stopped.

Music studios are beginning to see that in actuality a major benefit has arisen from this excited wave of free-sharing. More bands than ever before are turning a profit that may otherwise have been expected to fail, or would never have gathered attention at all. People with a love for genres outside the easily accepted norm have created hundreds of self-categorized sub-genres that make demands for sound that popular radio wouldn’t have given a chance.

With internet acting as a proliferation zone for both standard genres and subgenres, personal audio libraries are becoming extremely diverse. Although illegal downloading is still prevalent within society, producers have taken notice of the possible marketing techniques through free song downloads. Many companies are now offering free song samples and limited time specials to customers as an incentive for further purchase.

The success of many small businesses that moved online gave much needed confidence to larger companies to follow suit and make the journey along the virtual highway. Apple has released their iTunes Store, a program that one can download online, allowing customers to make large or small purchases of many different songs and albums. The iTunes Store allows a person to select only the songs he or she wants from a particular album without requiring the person to purchase the whole album.

Connection to the world-wide-web has also made the library itself a variable tool. In years past, there was only the default music player that came equipped in the software of the computer itself, but now many different programs compete for the most popular install online. Some provide the music in stores, connect to a portable device like an iPod, burn disks, shrink file sizes, organize, and find all information for an untitled MP3. These programs have also inspired easier creation of independently made music from home that can be quickly shared with the world with a simple click of the mouse.

The internet has proved itself to be a guaranteed source of endless possibilities for many people and industries. The transformation of music collections from a physical library of records, cassettes and CDs, to an intangible virtual form has the web to thank. Even though there are those who see the online virtual music libraries as a deviation from the norm, there is no doubt that internet connection will continue to change how people use them.

This article has been written by the author, Eric James. Should you require anymoreaccupuncture treatmentsplease visit his acupressure weight loss resources!

To every iTunes Music Store sucker, thanks a billion
internet piracy
Image by Thomas Hawk
ABC News: iTunes: One Billion Served Crank up the old PR and spin machine. Apple today announced their one billionth iTunes download today. The song? Speed of Sound by Cold Play.

"Over one billion songs have now been legally purchased and downloaded around the globe, representing a major force against music piracy and the future of music distribution as we move from CDs to the Internet," said Apple CEO Steve Jobs.

Personally I’ve never bought an iTune and I don’t own an iPod. I think Apple’s DRM is awful and represents a major step back for us all. I think those that are investing in iTune digital libraries are suckers. You are basically betting that Apple’s proprietary DRM laced format will be the standard for the rest of your life. You are paying too much for your music and tying yourself to only Apple products going forward. More innovative ways to play your music may indeed come in the future but unless they are marketed by Apple you will not likely be able to use these devices with your iTunes files due to Apple’s tight proprietary control.

Personally I want nothing to do with it. I still collect my digital music the old fashioned way, I rip it straight from CDs to crystal clear high bit rate DRM free mp3s. These files of course can be played on any device and represent better value in my opinion for today’s consumer.

What happens when the killer phone is finally here? You know the one, built in terabyte of storage, lightening fast file transfer speeds, full satellite radio, a breathalyzer, your car and house key, a tiny little thing the size of credit card with a 12 mega pixel camera on it (hey it’s the future right, we can dream). What happens when this phone is out and you really want it and unfortunately Apple didn’t make it? That’s right, you’re a sucker then aren’t you. I thought so. You paid all that good money for your iTunes and now you can’t put them on your new phone because your new phone threatens Apple’s dominance. So who owns the music anyway? You or them? They do. You bought nothing. You bought the right to play their song on their product. It might work today. But I’m not about to bet that this will be the format du jour 10 years from now.

click here for more: thomashawk.com/2006/02/itunes-one-billion-suckers-served….

I talk about internet piracy.

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Music Piracy

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Topple track; Protecting artists from piracy. The debate: Should you give your music away for free these days?
On first impressions, Topple Track looks confusingly like a site for (very delicious) burgers. It’s not however; it’s much more useful than that. It’s even more useful than it is hunger inducing. Topple Track provides musicians with ‘the most comprehensive anti-piracy services on the web’ protecting musicians from the bane of the music industry; the illegal download.

Obviously there are other guys out there who claim to do this, but in comparison, those guys are part timers. These guys are serious! Self professed ‘internet nerds’, they’ve got pretty much every angle covered. Signing up with Topple Track before releasing your song (or before it leaks!) means if people want your tracks… they gonna have to pay!

They don’t just wait around for people to upload the tracks then hope they can delete the links before millions of people illegally download them, they use all sorts of whizz-kid algorithms to find the file’s source and stop it before even it gets on to major search engines.

You think you’d be paying through the nose for a service with this kind of technology, but the prices are insanely reasonable- you could pay as little as $ 3 to protect a track FOREVER. When you think about how much money you could potentially make from a single track if you were getting everything you should, this is an easy-decision investment. It’s something we’re pretty impressed by here at Music Gateway, as we believe strongly in protection for musicians. You’re really not getting ripped off at all with Topple; they’re genuinely doing you a solid.

Now to a record label, using a service like this is a no brainer. But from an individual music producer/ songwriter’s point of view, there are a lot of arguments for and against stopping people illegally downloading. You want people to hear your music- it’s all about exposure right? Ok so people are getting your stuff and not giving you any money. But at least they’re listening to you instead of just One Direction, right? Hopefully they’re sharing your songs with their friends, increasing your reach and just maybe your economical fan will one day part hands with his hard earned cash to see one of your shows. Just maybe.

Man up fellah! Grow a pair! You deserve something in return for the gift you’ve imparted to the world. Have some belief in your self-worth. No you didn’t make the music for the money- but a girl’s gotta eat. If you’re making good stuff and people want to hear it, then it has value and you should claim that. People are only downloading illegally these days because it’s the done thing and so artists are basically bending to mob rule.

Look at Radiohead’s 2007 release ‘In Rainbows’ which they released for free. Radiohead are one of the biggest bands out there, having sold in excess of 30,000,000 records. People want their music, but it turns out they don’t want to pay. Despite the band’s bohemian attitude, despite the fact they trusted their fans to do the right thing, the majority of people downloaded for free. They still made a lot of money from it, but that’s because they’re Radiohead. Smaller bands probably would have gone hungry.

Take another example, Ed Sheeran; now there’s a music career. His album ‘+’ was the number one illegally downloaded album in the UK this year, with an average of 55,512 illegal downloads a month, but he only actually sold a small fraction of that. He says he doesn’t mind, but it’s pretty common knowledge that he regularly sleeps on his mate’s sofas. While this may be a marketing ploy, the figures speak for themselves; he’s making way less money than he should be. What’s the point in being famous if you don’t get the perks? I think TLC spoke for women everywhere when they said they ‘don’t want no scrubs’.

I digress. In this fast paced digital world where the face of the music industry is constantly changing, you never know what could make you the next big thing. The reality is though that the majority of us just want to know when we can have the next big burger. You’ve worked hard on your music, so take some pride in it, value it. It’s the only way that other people will and that could be the key to change. When cultural conscience believes that a song is an expression of an artist’s soul once again, and not just an mp3 file, that’s when there will be a much brighter future for musicians. Overly sentimental? Probably. But if you believe in improving careers in music like we do, then you know that something has to change. Perhaps this is one of the first steps.

I work for MusicGateway.net, we aim to connect musicians globally.

Music gateway is the place to find the right talent and the right projects, improving the way professionals network, connect and find work. We remove time consuming industry legwork so professionals can focus on creativity. MusicGateway.net also ensures security to everyone involved with our secure E-wallet system. Our unique project work-spaces encompass everything required to collaborate and communicate with other creatives.

If you’re looking for work opportunities, career development, people to collaborate with or advice then sign up for free. The music industry is full of barriers, but we’re breaking those down by putting everyone on a level playing-field.

Net Neutrality – Special Interests keep wishing for death
internet piracy
Image by DonkeyHotey
Corporations, government and the courts are continually proposing new threats to Net Neutrality and Internet Freedom, including: PIPA, SOPA, CISPA, ACTA, and now TPP. On top that Verizon V. FCC wants to turn the Internet into Cabletown. Read this: "We’re About to Lose Net Neutrality — And the Internet as We Know It."

The Network Neutrality logo is an image in the public domain from Wikimedia.

Note: I chose 1995 as the date the Internet use was made popular.

Louis CK on internet piracy

I don’t care about those people!!
Video Rating: / 5

How The Music Industry Has Been Changed By The Internet

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The music industry has gone through a lot of changes, in the past 15 years. With the revolution that the Internet has created, the music industry has changed forever. Owing to the Internet, music has changed in terms of how music is bought, how artists gain market exposure and how music is shared. Not only have there been massive changes in the music industry but also the pace at which these changes are happening, have increased as a result of the Internet. With new technologies being developed every time, the Internet grows stronger and becomes more and more convenient, every year. Whether you like it or not, the Internet is here to stay and so the changes made to the music industry are here to stay as well.

Here are some things in the music industry that have been changed as a result of the Internet:

Purchasing Music Online
Today, the use of CDs and cassettes are becoming obsolete. Some people don’t want to buy an entire CD but only a song or two. With the Internet, songs can now be sold separately. It has been more convenient to sell music, through the Internet. With the capability for a certain music artist to sell his or her songs through the Internet, a wider audience can be reached but owing to the widespread use of the internet for buying music CD’s, a lot of music companies have lost significant amount of revenue. Although their songs are reaching more people, mostly individual songs are being sold and not whole albums.

Getting Exposure Online
One very powerful feature of the Internet is the power of promoting people. It is mostly free and these promotions can spread quite quickly. An artist can ultimately gain a lot of exposure with the help of the online world. With the Internet, artists are able to post videos, sending out a message to their fans and easily have it available to anyone who wants to view them online. Through various social networking sites, the music artists can keep in touch with their fans, from all around the world. Setting and posting dates online for gigs and concerts is also a lot easier because of the Internet.

Online Piracy
Although the music industry with the help of online technologies has helped in boosting an artist’s or band’s exposure and has made purchasing songs a lot more convenient, one big problem that the music industry continues to face is online music piracy. With all the technologies that we have today, it is extremely easy to steal songs off the internet. People can get free mp3 downloads as easily as they can purchase songs from legitimate websites. Online piracy resulted in the music industry losing millions of dollars in revenues, every year.

To combat piracy, many music companies now offer free downloads of their songs in low quality. Legitimate free downloads are provided and there are no legal issues involved in downloading the freely available songs. Once music fans all over the world download them and listen to them, if they like they can purchase the high quality ones. Also, a lot of new technologies are being developed so that the copy protection on the downloaded songs cannot be easily broken. Many legal bodies are being formed to find out places where piracy is happening. Many national governments have made their laws against piracy very strict. If you are caught doing or supporting piracy directly or indirectly, it can lead to severe liabilities.

There are many websites these days. Websites are getting better and better owing to quality web hosting services. Quality service providers like Hostgator help make websites more user friendly and accessible to the music fans around the world. Hostgator coupons and hostgator coupon code for you.

Listen to Teddy – Stop SOPA and PIPA
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Image by DonkeyHotey
"…to dissolve the unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics, is the first task of the statesmanship of the day." – Theodore Roosevelt

Do you want to share a relevant quote? Please do so in comments below.

THE WEB GOES ON STRIKE! Read All About It!

NOTE: After experiencing the day of protest about SOPA/PIP it is clear that the action could better be called a Web Blackout rather than a Strike.

TAKE ACTION! Google has a form.

More complete quote:
Political parties exist to secure responsible government and to execute the will of the people. From these great tasks both of the old parties have turned aside. Instead of instruments to promote the general welfare they have become the tools of corrupt interests, which use them impartially to serve their selfish purposes. Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people. To destroy this invisible government, to dissolve the unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics, is the first task of the statesmanship of the day.

The source image for this caricature was adapted from a black and white image available at the Library of Congress website.

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