How Music Libraries Were Transformed By The Internet

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As with any new, widely accessible invention, the internet was feared for its easy and quick distribution of items and ideas. Many music labels and artists set forth an endeavor to prevent the use of the web as a means to spread their creations illegally. However, the progressive internet and those who inhabit it could not be stopped.

Music studios are beginning to see that in actuality a major benefit has arisen from this excited wave of free-sharing. More bands than ever before are turning a profit that may otherwise have been expected to fail, or would never have gathered attention at all. People with a love for genres outside the easily accepted norm have created hundreds of self-categorized sub-genres that make demands for sound that popular radio wouldn’t have given a chance.

With internet acting as a proliferation zone for both standard genres and subgenres, personal audio libraries are becoming extremely diverse. Although illegal downloading is still prevalent within society, producers have taken notice of the possible marketing techniques through free song downloads. Many companies are now offering free song samples and limited time specials to customers as an incentive for further purchase.

The success of many small businesses that moved online gave much needed confidence to larger companies to follow suit and make the journey along the virtual highway. Apple has released their iTunes Store, a program that one can download online, allowing customers to make large or small purchases of many different songs and albums. The iTunes Store allows a person to select only the songs he or she wants from a particular album without requiring the person to purchase the whole album.

Connection to the world-wide-web has also made the library itself a variable tool. In years past, there was only the default music player that came equipped in the software of the computer itself, but now many different programs compete for the most popular install online. Some provide the music in stores, connect to a portable device like an iPod, burn disks, shrink file sizes, organize, and find all information for an untitled MP3. These programs have also inspired easier creation of independently made music from home that can be quickly shared with the world with a simple click of the mouse.

The internet has proved itself to be a guaranteed source of endless possibilities for many people and industries. The transformation of music collections from a physical library of records, cassettes and CDs, to an intangible virtual form has the web to thank. Even though there are those who see the online virtual music libraries as a deviation from the norm, there is no doubt that internet connection will continue to change how people use them.

This article has been written by the author, Eric James. Should you require anymoreaccupuncture treatmentsplease visit his acupressure weight loss resources!

To every iTunes Music Store sucker, thanks a billion
internet piracy
Image by Thomas Hawk
ABC News: iTunes: One Billion Served Crank up the old PR and spin machine. Apple today announced their one billionth iTunes download today. The song? Speed of Sound by Cold Play.

"Over one billion songs have now been legally purchased and downloaded around the globe, representing a major force against music piracy and the future of music distribution as we move from CDs to the Internet," said Apple CEO Steve Jobs.

Personally I’ve never bought an iTune and I don’t own an iPod. I think Apple’s DRM is awful and represents a major step back for us all. I think those that are investing in iTune digital libraries are suckers. You are basically betting that Apple’s proprietary DRM laced format will be the standard for the rest of your life. You are paying too much for your music and tying yourself to only Apple products going forward. More innovative ways to play your music may indeed come in the future but unless they are marketed by Apple you will not likely be able to use these devices with your iTunes files due to Apple’s tight proprietary control.

Personally I want nothing to do with it. I still collect my digital music the old fashioned way, I rip it straight from CDs to crystal clear high bit rate DRM free mp3s. These files of course can be played on any device and represent better value in my opinion for today’s consumer.

What happens when the killer phone is finally here? You know the one, built in terabyte of storage, lightening fast file transfer speeds, full satellite radio, a breathalyzer, your car and house key, a tiny little thing the size of credit card with a 12 mega pixel camera on it (hey it’s the future right, we can dream). What happens when this phone is out and you really want it and unfortunately Apple didn’t make it? That’s right, you’re a sucker then aren’t you. I thought so. You paid all that good money for your iTunes and now you can’t put them on your new phone because your new phone threatens Apple’s dominance. So who owns the music anyway? You or them? They do. You bought nothing. You bought the right to play their song on their product. It might work today. But I’m not about to bet that this will be the format du jour 10 years from now.

click here for more: thomashawk.com/2006/02/itunes-one-billion-suckers-served….

I talk about internet piracy.

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